Speeding Traffic through the Village

Is it time to take real action on this subject?
Here below is an e-mail we received earlier this week from a frustrated village resident called Sally Mallam.

I use the village a lot to walk from Murley Grange, Forder lane into the village for shopping, the post office and chemist. The walk is frought with speeding traffic and many do more than the speed limit, several places do not have pavements. I would like to see the speed reduced to 20 mph with speed bumps along the road. How can this be expedited to the council to be discussed.

Best regards Sally Mallam

This topic has been raised time and again but we seem no closer to a workable solution. Feel free to jump into the discussion by leaving your comments below!

Update 15.10.18 – Star User Comment:

Mark Le Briton has eloquently highlighted some of the issues with regard to the actual speed of traffic in villages and those measures that could be introduced.
Considerable experience has shown that the perceived speed of moving traffic is generally higher than the actual speed. In this regard it would be required to establish the average speed of traffic travelling through Bishopsteignton along with the volume of traffic. This would best be served by carrying out some form of traffic survey in which the local speed watch team could participate.
If the results indicate that the recorded traffic speed is around < 24mph then the introduction of a 20mph speed limit would to be deemed most appropriate.
For higher recorded average speeds, some form of traffic calming would be required to reduce speeds and to establish a self-enforcing 20mph Zone. Traffic calming could be in he form of traffic throttles (chicanes , narrowing, etc.,) Give and Take, rumble strips, speed cushions and speed bumps, to name a few. From time served experience the latter of these i.e. speed bumps, cushions and rumble strips, are not favoured in residential areas for obvious reasons due to their induced problems concerned with traffic noise. Moreover, the emergency services do not favour humps or cushions. Actually, one the most cost effective measures to reduce traffic speed is actually on-street parking. Evidence has shown where parking is removed traffic speeds increase appreciably. However, with careful design the inclusion of a range of traffic calming measures will produce a very effective 20mph Zone but that could be at a price.
Just a word on One-Way systems. Such systems should so designed and implemented as to reduce the likelihood of an increase in traffic circulation that would obviously occur. Consequently such systems may very well not suit many villages.
Hope this brief note is of use.
Kindest Regards

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9 Responses

  1. Finella says:

    Walking in the village is dangerous with so many elderly not using the pathways because so uneven. Speed humps could be an option. One way system through the main drive through could be another. Bring the speed limit down could help but only if monitored. Could people just be more considerate??

  2. Jessica Moore says:

    I agree – a twenty limit plus speed bumps, especially in the sections where the pavement is narrow and/or slopes. Those bits are potentially the most dangerous for every pedestrian, but even more so for people with children, pushchairs, dogs or with walking aids of any sort.

  3. Megan Molyneux says:

    I live in the narrowest part of Fore Street, and take my life in my hands each time I want to go to the chemist or shop. I have mobility problems and find the pavements are barely accessible for me. A 20mph speed limit is an excellent idea, I look forward to it being implemented!

  4. Mark Le Breton says:

    The local Police Officer, if there is such a thing, could be asked to monitor speeds with a laser. In my experience such monitoring nearly always indicates a perception of speed as opposed to actual speeding (I’m not denigrating such perception btw). However, with the small streets etc I think there is a real justification to lowering the speed limit so that actual speeds are brought down. However, my understanding is that such action is very much cost and statistics driven, and of course will a reduced speed limit be enforceable given that the Police spend most of their time dealing with domestics nowadays? Does anyone know if there have been injury road collisions in the village in recent past?

  5. Mike Ashburn says:

    I doubt many people exceed the speed limit of 30mph in the narrow parts of the village. However, 30 is too fast along most of the village streets and is ignored on the Newton Road.
    Perhaps the village could get a 20mph limit for most of the village, keep 30mph on Newton Road and then ‘enforce’ or ‘encourage’ people to stick to the limit using a Speedwatch volunteer group such as was in our last village. It helps when drivers get a letter from the police warning them to behave even though speeding is not enforceable by a Speedwatch team.

  6. Peter Brunt says:

    Mark Le Briton has eloquently highlighted some of the issues with regard to the actual speed of traffic in villages and those measures that could be introduced.
    Considerable experience has shown that the perceived speed of moving traffic is generally higher than the actual speed. In this regard it would be required to establish the average speed of traffic travelling through Bishopsteignton along with the volume of traffic. This would best be served by carrying out some form of traffic survey in which the local speed watch team could participate.
    If the results indicate that the recorded traffic speed is around < 24mph then the introduction of a 20mph speed limit would to be deemed most appropriate.
    For higher recorded average speeds, some form of traffic calming would be required to reduce speeds and to establish a self-enforcing 20mph Zone. Traffic calming could be in he form of traffic throttles (chicanes , narrowing, etc.,) Give and Take, rumble strips, speed cushions and speed bumps, to name a few. From time served experience the latter of these i.e. speed bumps, cushions and rumble strips, are not favoured in residential areas for obvious reasons due to their induced problems concerned with traffic noise. Moreover, the emergency services do not favour humps or cushions. Actually, one the most cost effective measures to reduce traffic speed is actually on-street parking. Evidence has shown where parking is removed traffic speeds increase appreciably. However, with careful design the inclusion of a range of traffic calming measures will produce a very effective 20mph Zone but that could be at a price.
    Just a word on One-Way systems. Such systems should so designed and implemented as to reduce the likelihood of an increase in traffic circulation that would obviously occur. Consequently such systems may very well not suit many villages.
    Hope this brief note is of use.
    Kindest Regards

  7. Claire Evans says:

    A 20mph speed limit can be the only sensible option. I live on Fore St and speeding traffic is a problem – cars race to get through the village before hitting inevitable holdups – but it’s even worse on Forder Lane, Shute Hill etc. Is there a village campaign to get a speed limit implemented?

  8. Claire evans says:

    I think it would be an excellent idea. Walking in the village is dangerous, especially for the elderly with walking aids, children, and dog walkers.

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